The cookie settings on this website are adjusted to allow all cookies so that you have the very best experience. If you continue without changing your cookie settings, we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies on our website. However, if you would like to, you can change your settings at any time using the Change cookie settings link in the Special menu. 
    
 

Printable version

Guns

Guns Guns

Products


  • US Airborne M1 57mm anti-tank gun

    The U.S. version, classified as substitute standard under the designation 57 mm Gun M1, was based on the 6 pounder Mk 2, two units of which were received from the UK.

    Production started early in 1942 and continued until 1945 and the M1A2 introduced the British practice of free traverse, i.e. the gun could be traversed by the crew pushing and pulling on the breech, instead of a solely geared traverse, from September 1942.

    A more stable carriage was developed but not introduced. Once the 57 mm entered US service a modified towing point design was introduced (the M1A3) but only for US use. American shell designs and production lagged behind the introduction of the gun once it was accepted for service and so at first only AP shot was available. The HE shell was not available until after the Normandy landings and UK stocks were procured to cover its absence.

    In spring 1943, following the experience of the North African Campaign where allied guns struggled against German armour, the Infantry branch of the U.S. Army recognised the need to field a heavier antitank gun than the 37 mm M3. and from 26 May 1943, a regiment antitank company included nine 57 mm guns and each battalion had an antitank platoon with three guns giving a total of 18 guns per regiment.

    Introduction was made in the face of objections by the US Army Infantry Board which believed it too heavy. The Ordnance Board on the other hand where all for it however both Airborne and Cavalry rejected it. By mid-1944 the M1 was the standard antitank gun of the U.S. infantry in the Western Front and outnumbered the M3 in Italy.

     Pack contains 1 metal gun and 3 metal crew figures.

    Note: Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
    WGB-AA-23
    £13.00
     
  • US Army M1 57mm anti-tank gun

    The U.S. version, classified as substitute standard under the designation 57 mm Gun M1, was based on the 6 pounder Mk 2, two units of which were received from the UK.

    Production started early in 1942 and continued until 1945 and the M1A2 introduced the British practice of free traverse, i.e. the gun could be traversed by the crew pushing and pulling on the breech, instead of a solely geared traverse, from September 1942.

    A more stable carriage was developed but not introduced. Once the 57 mm entered US service a modified towing point design was introduced (the M1A3) but only for US use. American shell designs and production lagged behind the introduction of the gun once it was accepted for service and so at first only AP shot was available. The HE shell was not available until after the Normandy landings and UK stocks were procured to cover its absence.

    In spring 1943, following the experience of the North African Campaign where allied guns struggled against German armour, the Infantry branch of the U.S. Army recognised the need to field a heavier antitank gun than the 37 mm M3. and from 26 May 1943, a regiment antitank company included nine 57 mm guns and each battalion had an antitank platoon with three guns giving a total of 18 guns per regiment.

    Introduction was made in the face of objections by the US Army Infantry Board which believed it too heavy. The Ordnance Board on the other hand where all for it however both Airborne and Cavalry rejected it. By mid-1944 the M1 was the standard antitank gun of the U.S. infantry in the Western Front and outnumbered the M3 in Italy.

     Pack contains 1 metal gun and 3 metal crew figures.

    Note: Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
    WGB-AI-30
    £13.00
     
  • US Army M1 37mm anti-tank gun

    The 37 mm Gun M3 was the first dedicated anti-tank gun fielded by United States forces. Introduced in 1940, it became their standard with its size enabling it to be pulled by a jeep. However, the continuing improvement of German tanks quickly rendered the 37 mm ineffective, and by 1943 it was being gradually replaced in the European and Mediterranean theatres by the more powerful British-developed 57 mm Gun M1.

    In the Pacific, where the Japanese tank threat was less significant, the M3 remained in service until the end of the war. Like many other light anti-tank guns, the M3 was widely used in the infantry support role and as an anti-personnel weapon, firing high-explosive and canister rounds.

    The M3 saw action for the first time during the defence of the Philippines in December 1941. It went on to become a factor in the Guadalcanal Campaign, where it was successfully employed against both Japanese armour and infantry.

    Throughout the war it remained effective against Japanese vehicles, which were thinly armoured and were rarely committed in large groups. The light weight of the gun made it easy to move through difficult terrain, against enemy fortifications the M3 was only somewhat effective because of its small high-explosive projectile.

    Its overall effectiveness and ease of use meant the gun remained in service with the Marine Corps and with some Army units in the Pacific until the end of the war.

    Pack contains 1 metal gun and 3 metal crew figures.
    WGB-AI-32
    £12.00
     
  • US Army 75mm Howitzer

    Pack contains 1 metal gun and 3 metal crew figures.
    WGB-AI-33
    £13.00
     
  • US Army 30 Cal MMG teams

    Providing the light machine gun of choice throughout WWII , the M1919A4 .30 Cal saw wide use during the Second World War and for decades beyond.

    Pack contains 4 metal figures & 1 gun


    Note: Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
    WGB-AI-34
    £7.00
     
  • Bolt Action US Army M2A1 105mm howitzer

    This Bolt Action Pack contains 1 metal gun and 4 metal crew.

    Note: Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
    WGB-AI-35
    £16.00
     
  • US Army M5 3" Anti Tank Gun

    This Warlord Games pack Pack contains 1 metal anti-tank gun and 4 crew figures figures.
    WGB-AI-36
    £16.00
     
  • US Army 50 Cal HMG team

    Arguably the best heavy machine gun of the war, over 2,000,000 .50 calibre M2 machine guns were made during the course of the Second World War. As the most powerful small arms weapon at the disposal of American forces, the M2 would become affectionately known as 'Ma Deuce' or simply 'the fifty'.

    Pack contains 4 metal figures & a gun

    Note: Models supplied unassembled and unpainted

    WGB-AI-37
    £8.00
     
  • German Afrika Korps 5cm PAK 38 Anti-Tank Gun

    This Warlord Games pack contains 1 metal gun and 3 metal crew miniatures
    WGB-AK-21
    £13.00
     
  • British Airborne 75mm Pack Howitzer

    British airborne paratroopers with 75mm pack howitzer. One gun and three crew.

    Note: Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
    WGB-BA-23
    £13.00
     
  • British Airborne Six Pounder AT Gun

    A model of the British airborne six pounder anti tank gun. This version has a cut down shield, folding trails, tie down points and other minor mods to enable it to be dropped on the battle field. The gun comes with two paratrooper crew figures, shot shells, shell cases.

    Note: Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
    WGB-BA-24
    £13.00
     
  • British Airborne Vickers HMG Team

    A tripod mounted Vickers MG and three Paratrooper crew.

    Note: Models supplied unassembled and unpainted
    WGB-BA-26
    £7.00